Narukami’s Lunch Box: 4/25 Shogayaki (Pork Ginger)
     > Make lunch for tomorrow?
Shogayaki is a simplistic and healthy pork dish that can be found in many homemade bento lunch boxes across Japan. It makes a good main dish, both as dinner and lunch. 
Ingredients:
1-2 lbs. of Pork Tenderloin
2 tbsp. Fresh Grated Ginger
1/2 tbsp. Minced Garlic
2-3 tbsp. Sake
2-3 tbsp. Mirin*
2 tbsp Soy Sauce
150 grams of Shredded Cabbage
This list will make dinner for one as well as a large packed lunch for the next day (unless you’re feeding Kanji). The varying amounts of ingredients are really dependent on how strong you want the ginger taste in your pork. Depending on how hot your stove is, you might want a higher ratio of marinade to pork in order to keep it less dry.
*Mirin is a Japanese condiment similar to sake in cooking. It is thicker and sweeter.
     > Surprisingly…
     > You have enough ingredients to make pork ginger.
     > You decided to make pork ginger.
The Marinade:
Wash the ginger well. Grate the ginger into a regular-sized mixing bowl until you have about 2 tablespoons worth.
Mix in the mirin, sake, soy sauce and minced garlic. Stir until completely mixed together.
Cover and put off to the side.
The marinade is pretty simple, but can be changed if the person you’re serving thinks ginger is too strong normally. A simple solution to this would be to add a little white sugar to the marinade. Reducing the amount of ginger you put in can also help.

     > ……

     ***Narukami’s Protip*** Score it with a knife.
The Meat:
Cut off any unnecessary fat around the corners of the tenderloin pieces. If you can, edge off the sides of the pieces to make them smaller. Cut pieces about two inches long, or at least small enough to be bite sized in your lunch.
Score the meat with your knife. Be careful not to cut too deep— try to sink the knife in about half way each cut. This will help the meat absorb more of the marinade.
Set the pieces of meat into the bowl one by one, and rub them with the marinade. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least an hour.
Depending on how thick the meat is, you may want to cut it thinner. Thinner cuts take less time to cook and may end up less dry as a result. Cutting off all the edges of the tenderloin slab also makes the meat less likely to curl or bend when you cook it.

     > You scored the meat and rubbed it with the marinating sauce.
The Cooking:
Start up the stove somewhere between medium and high. Begin heating a medium sized frying pan with cooking oil.
Take the meat out of the marinade and set it in the pan piece by piece. Watch carefully and turn pieces over when ready. Try to get meat crispy but not burnt. Add some marinade to the pan for extra flavor if you’d like it stronger.
When the meat is finished, line a plate (or lunch box) with shredded cabbage and lay it on top. If need be, drizzle the sauce that was in the pan with the meat on top to give the cabbage flavor.
If you’d like to use the marinade as sauce, make sure you either cook some with the meat or in a separate pan. This may help especially if you overcook or dry out the meat on your first attempt. If it sucks too bad you could always make bait from it…


     > Obtained Aromatic Pork Ginger.






This recipe is among the easier of the lunches you can make. All the meat lovers in Inaba will totally want you to share!

Narukami’s Lunch Box: 4/25 Shogayaki (Pork Ginger)

     > Make lunch for tomorrow?

Shogayaki is a simplistic and healthy pork dish that can be found in many homemade bento lunch boxes across Japan. It makes a good main dish, both as dinner and lunch. 

Ingredients:

  • 1-2 lbs. of Pork Tenderloin
  • 2 tbsp. Fresh Grated Ginger
  • 1/2 tbsp. Minced Garlic
  • 2-3 tbsp. Sake
  • 2-3 tbsp. Mirin*
  • 2 tbsp Soy Sauce
  • 150 grams of Shredded Cabbage

This list will make dinner for one as well as a large packed lunch for the next day (unless you’re feeding Kanji). The varying amounts of ingredients are really dependent on how strong you want the ginger taste in your pork. Depending on how hot your stove is, you might want a higher ratio of marinade to pork in order to keep it less dry.

*Mirin is a Japanese condiment similar to sake in cooking. It is thicker and sweeter.

     > Surprisingly…

     > You have enough ingredients to make pork ginger.

     > You decided to make pork ginger.

The Marinade:

  1. Wash the ginger well. Grate the ginger into a regular-sized mixing bowl until you have about 2 tablespoons worth.
  2. Mix in the mirin, sake, soy sauce and minced garlic. Stir until completely mixed together.
  3. Cover and put off to the side.
The marinade is pretty simple, but can be changed if the person you’re serving thinks ginger is too strong normally. A simple solution to this would be to add a little white sugar to the marinade. Reducing the amount of ginger you put in can also help.

     > ……

     ***Narukami’s Protip*** Score it with a knife.

The Meat:

  1. Cut off any unnecessary fat around the corners of the tenderloin pieces. If you can, edge off the sides of the pieces to make them smaller. Cut pieces about two inches long, or at least small enough to be bite sized in your lunch.
  2. Score the meat with your knife. Be careful not to cut too deep— try to sink the knife in about half way each cut. This will help the meat absorb more of the marinade.
  3. Set the pieces of meat into the bowl one by one, and rub them with the marinade. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least an hour.
Depending on how thick the meat is, you may want to cut it thinner. Thinner cuts take less time to cook and may end up less dry as a result. Cutting off all the edges of the tenderloin slab also makes the meat less likely to curl or bend when you cook it.

     > You scored the meat and rubbed it with the marinating sauce.

The Cooking:

  1. Start up the stove somewhere between medium and high. Begin heating a medium sized frying pan with cooking oil.
  2. Take the meat out of the marinade and set it in the pan piece by piece. Watch carefully and turn pieces over when ready. Try to get meat crispy but not burnt. Add some marinade to the pan for extra flavor if you’d like it stronger.
  3. When the meat is finished, line a plate (or lunch box) with shredded cabbage and lay it on top. If need be, drizzle the sauce that was in the pan with the meat on top to give the cabbage flavor.
If you’d like to use the marinade as sauce, make sure you either cook some with the meat or in a separate pan. This may help especially if you overcook or dry out the meat on your first attempt. If it sucks too bad you could always make bait from it…

     > Obtained Aromatic Pork Ginger.

This recipe is among the easier of the lunches you can make. All the meat lovers in Inaba will totally want you to share!
  1. archaicflash reblogged this from sakura-ouji
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  6. tell-her-this683 reblogged this from vintage-aerith and added:
    MAKING THIS.
  7. namitori reblogged this from linefaced
  8. dyzzyah reblogged this from vintage-aerith and added:
    must try making this sometime, too!
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  15. jordoofus said: GINGER SMELLS BAD
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